Bed Bath & Beyond: Their Facebook “Like” Ask And Why It Fails

I received an email from Bed Bath & Beyond this morning with the subject header – Like our FB page? Give it a thumbs up! I don’t know who is in charge of their social media strategy but I think they need some unsolicited advice.

1. As a national brand you should not assume everyone you are emailing inherently knows that FB is an abbreviation of the word, Facebook.  Don’t alienate potential customers by assuming their world is your world.

2. You are asking me like your page so “we” can be connected” and “join the conversation” and so I “don’t miss a thing” but the reason why many consumers flock to the social presences of companies is because they offer tangible benefits such as coupons and discounts. There is no incentive to participate other then to talk… about water filters? Bedding? Not a very tantalizing offer.

The findings of a survey recently conducted by Market Force – a worldwide leader in customer intelligence solutions queryied more than 12,000 consumers in the US and UK, they wanted to see how consumers engaged with varying industries – retail, restaurant, travel, entertainment and financial businesses to be specific, via the big dogs of social media: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.

The findings revealed that 78% of respondents said the posts by companies they follow on social media impact their purchases.

One can assume all of these brands who directly impacted the 12,000 respondents were offering a truckload of freebies, coupons and other various promotions in an attempt to directly influence purchase decisions. If Bed Bath and Beyond wants to run a successful social media campaign they need to give more per “like” and not just ask without anything in return.

Erika Kirsten Beck is the founder and president of Ryder Media Consultants which designs, develops and implements custom social media business strategies and campaigns that create awareness for an organization’s products or services. She specializes in social media strategy development. Follow her on twitter: @RyderMedia. Like her on Facebook: www.facebook.com/RyderMedia or  http://klout.com/#/RyderMedia.

5 Ways To Increase Your #Klout Score, Even If You think It’s A Stupid Waste Of Time. #socialmedia #sm

So you have to deal with Klout. But you don’t have to let it push you around.

  1. Tweet more often – One of Klout’s criteria is frequency of tweets. So increase yours.
  2. Specialize – Tweet and post about just one or two different topics. Become known as an expert. Interested in a wide range of topics? Great. Just don’t post, blog, tweet or pin about them. They’re not helping your score.
  3. Follow the crowd – See a popular article on a popular Website? Tweet it or post it. Comment on it (just like this article about Klout!). That extremely moving and interesting post on your friend’s blog about the item that you actually care about? Ignore it. It’s hurting your Klout score.
  4. Suck up – Culitivate online relationships with netizens who have higher Klout scores than you do. Retweet their tweets, share their posts, comment on their blogs. In turn, if they follow good “netiquette,” they’ll retweet, share, etc your content as well, automagically pushing your Klout score higher. And you get a little bump just from associating with higher-scoring peeps.
  5. Get happy! – Tweet and post enthusiastically about upbeat topics. Because Studies Have Shown that upbeat updates get more positive engagement across social media sites.

Erika Kirsten Beck is the founder and president of Ryder Media Consultants which designs, develops and implements custom social media business strategies and campaigns that create awareness for an organization’s products or services. She specializes in social media strategy development. Follow her on twitter: @RyderMedia. Like her on Facebook: www.facebook.com/RyderMedia or  http://klout.com/#/RyderMedia.

The Perfect Moment Goes Perfectly Viral

Two weeks ago, the planet’s most unlikely film star turned from a Ugandan warlord to a nine-year-old kid who runs a homemade cardboard arcade out of his dad’s used-auto-parts store, Smart Parts, in East Los Angeles. Invisible children to a child’s imagination: the world could smile again. “Caine’s Arcade,” an eleven-minute film about Caine Monroy and his first customer, a struggling filmmaker named Nirvan Mullick, quickly acquired all the metrics of a viral sensation: millions of YouTube views, a top trending topic on Twitter worldwide, the Reddit front page, a call from Letterman’s people. The adulations flooded Mullick’s inbox, including one from the hacker collective Anonymous: “I commend you for your great work. You should be proud,” the e-mail read.

“It felt as though I had been knighted by the Internet,” Mullick told me. (When he tried to reply to Anonymous, the message bounced back with a scrambled auto-response.) Next, people began posting videos of themselves crying while watching the film. A seventeen-year veteran of “The Simpsons,” one among legions of recent pilgrims to Caine’s Arcade, broke down weeping at the sight of the real thing. He told Mullick that the moment recalled for him the scene in “Ratatouille” when the cynical food critic eats a bowl of soup, evoking visceral memories of his own mother’s cooking. “That’s what happened to me when Caine crawled into the box for the first time to push tickets out of a hole,” said Mullick. “It brought me back to when I was a kid, and reminded me of why I used to make things, why I wanted to make films, for the pure joy of creativity.”

When Mullick first posted “Caine’s Arcade” to YouTube, on April 9th, he added a way for people to donate to for Caine’s tuition—“imagine what this kid could build with an engineering degree”—and set a goal of twenty-five thousand dollars. He shared the link with an editor of Boing Boing, and then went to the climbing gym. While there, his phone began pinging with e-mail alerts—donations were already streaming in. Two dollars. Five dollars. Thirty dollars. Three hundred dollars. By the time Mullick went to sleep that first night, the film had raised six thousand dollars for Caine’s scholarship fund; when he woke up, it had reached sixteen thousand, and, later that day, surpassed a hundred and twenty thousand dollars. (Invitations to a summer program at M.I.T. and an offer from U.C.L.A. to customize an academic track for Caine would come later.)

And this is just how the grownups reacted. The film sparked an unexpected wave of young D.I.Y. activity around the world. Kids posted videos and photos of their own cardboard creations—pinball machines, bubble-gum machines, a photocopier inside of which a small person sits and draws whatever is laid on top of it. Teachers started showing the video in school. It’s not a stretch to say that “Caine’s Arcade” makes a convincing case for “connected learning,” a model that embraces social media as a way for kids to link up with peers and mentors—a kind of crowdsourced education. Riding the viral wave, Mullick has also launched Caine’s Arcade Foundation, with seed money from the Goldhirsh Foundation and a mission to “find, foster, and fund creativity and entrepreneurship in kids.” Naturally, there’s a TV series in the works, which will document young kids who make things, and match them with storytellers and entrepreneurs. “Caine’s Arcade” was released online, so it’s not eligible for an Academy Award. Even so, Hollywood studios have started circling for the film rights. A major studio has proposed that Mullick, whose longest film has a running time of eleven minutes, make a hundred-million-dollar, live-action feature based on the story of three characters in the film who were destined to meet.

That story unfolds like so: Caine, a shy boy with an active imagination who loves to make things. His father, George Monroy, owns an auto-parts business that has struggled in the Internet economy. (Caine’s parents are separated but live together; his mother doesn’t speak English.) And Mullick, who had been around Los Angeles for twelve years, making conceptual projects like the The 1 Second Film and flirting with the idea of doing more commercial work. Turning thirty-seven, Mullick was forced to consider how long he could keep driving a crappy car, live without health insurance, and chase an elusive dream of artistic prosperity. He had ventured into East L.A. that September afternoon because he needed spare parts to sell his ’96 Toyota Corolla. After passing all the stores that had men aggressively waving flags out front to attract business, Mullick settled on a quiet store that had a cute-looking swing hanging off a tree on the sidewalk.

Last weekend, the three stars of “Caine’s Arcade” visited the San Francisco Bay Area for their first road show of sorts, since the film hit the Web. The Exploratorium, an interactive science museum, sent a seventy-foot semitrailer to Smart Parts to retrieve Caine’s cardboard arcade for a one-day exhibition, called “Open MAKE: Trash.” The night before the event, after closing time, Caine set up the arcade with the help of volunteers, and ran around the place as though he was the museum’s V.I.P., which he was. “This is the coolest museum I have ever seen!” he noted from the back of a cart in which he was chauffeured.

That morning, the group had stopped in for an interview with Channel 7, the local ABC affiliate. The director Richard Linklater was there to promote his new film “Bernie,” and told Caine that he was a big fan of the arcade. The nine-year-old shrugged. (Word that another unknown, Oprah, had posted about the arcade on her Facebook page had prompted a similar reaction from the boy, although Justin Timberlake’s tweeting that Caine was his “new favorite entrepreneur” generated more of a response—at least Caine had heard of the guy.) Linklater was bumped to a later slot, and America’s most famous arcade proprietor was squeezed in, awkwardly, after a segment about April 20th as “weed day.” “Not ideal,” Mullick remarked.

Hundreds were queued at the Exploratorium for the exhibition—whether for the arcade or its maker was not clear. Three girls were gushing about Caine to a KCBS radio reporter. “We saw his video in school, and we thought he was the most adorable little kid in the world, so we decided to come here to see him,” one said. Another added, “Caine is like Justin Bieber,” but was corrected by the third: “He’s cooler than Justin Bieber. Justin Bieber doesn’t have a cardboard arcade.”

As a philosophy student at New College, Mullick had been intrigued by the notion of the “perfect moment,” which Sartre explores in his novel “Nausea.” What are perfect moments? Do they exist? Can you create them? “I distinctly remember putting the book down and thinking about ‘perfect moments’ and how I’d lose myself when I do a drawing, and all track of time.” Mullick said the other day. “What if you could look into a stranger and know what it was that they wanted more than anything else in the world, and figure out a way to choreograph, and make that perfect moment happen for them in their life,” he continued. “When I ran into Caine, I knew how to create a perfect moment for this boy. I knew what he wanted more than anything: customers.” Sitting at breakfast on their final day in San Francisco, Caine had found a perfect moment of his own devising. Reaching for a sugar shaker, he filled a metal spoon resting on the table with granules. “Imagination sugar!” he beamed. The arcade-maker bowed his head over the spoon and licked it clean.

Stuck on Pinterest? 8 Alternatives to Try

Don’t lock yourself into one platform. Here are 8 sitesImage to get your wares in front of more click-happy shoppers.

Have you pinned all of your marketing hopes on Pinterest? If so, it’s time to reconsider the law of working with new tech platforms: One day a platform is in, the next day it’s out—so don’t fall into the trap of pouring all of your time into the hottest one of the week.

You’re much better off spreading your efforts across multiple sites. Here are eight Pinterest-like services to check out. Sure, they might not have incredibly high page views (yet), but you never know when one of these might suddenly attract the attention of millions of new surfers looking for ideas.

1. Looqiloo

This brand new start-up, still in beta, is like Pinterest with video reviews. You can still browse through product categories and scan quickly through images, but other users post their thoughts about the product so you can decide if it is worth your time or not.

2. AllIReallyWant.me

The site All I Really Want (AIRW) claims to cut your clicks in half. Well, that’s true: With Pinterest, you click once to see an object of desire and then again to access the link for purchase. So, with AIRW, you can click once to see the purchase site for a new pair of glasses or a dress that catches your eye.

3. Postwire

Postwire is more like a private version of Pinterest. There are pages with links to products and services, and the same visual browsing slant. (The human eye can scan images faster than text.) But each page is a private link for articles, videos, and docs you send to potential customers.

“Instead of sending your client off to your website for a pricing page, your YouTube channel for customer testimonial, your Facebook page for a photo, and your blog for an article last week, we allow you to collect all of those disparate pieces of content into a simple, easy-to-view page where you can focus your client on the content that really matters,” explains co-founder Craig Daniel.

4. Pearltrees

This one might be a stretch, but there is a site discovery slant. Basically, Pearltrees lets you click on similar interest “trees” to find videos, links, and products. For a small business, there’s an interesting paradigm here: You can create an interest tree for whatever your product does. For example, here’s one tree for creating a website.

5. Main and Me

Pinterest is all about crafts and objects of desire. Main and Me offers a similar purview, but with a local feel. You can browse through items in your local area (or where you might be heading for a business trip). Geo-locating your business on a site like this might spur sales. The quick “nearby me” link can draw customers to your site, but the higher population areas will get the most traffic.

6. The Fancy

The Fancy is a pure-play Pinterest clone: It has thumbnails for unique products, including clothes, cars, and craft items. The big difference is that you can “fancy” something instead of using pins. End users let Facebook and Twitter friends know they have found an item-say, for a wedding. While that might not differentiate the site too much from Pinterest, it is another sales avenue.

7. StyleSays

I like the visual style of StyleSays, which has the same pinboards as Pinterest but the objects (with more of a home decor and personal style theme) are all sizes and shapes. There’s a clean white background, and instead of just pinning an item, you can “re say” something as a “first love” or “addiction.” For business owners, you have more control over the photo size of your product.

8. Knack Registry

It’s no secret that Pinterest has a primary user: those who are about to get married and want to let others know about gift ideas. Knack dispenses with the subtleties. Users look for gift registry ideas and share them with those who will be attending their wedding. In many ways, this makes the site like a wedding-centric version of Amazon, but the site is focused on smaller shops and artisans.

More from Inc.com:

Making Social Media ‘One Giant Hangout’ #smm #socialmedia

On a recent weekend afternoon, dozens of people showed up at the New York offices of Warby Parker, an online eyeglasses retailer. They were there to participate in a “photo walk” organized by the company. Every participant got a pair of novelty glasses to use in photos taken across the city. The company awarded prizes to images that received the most “likes” after being uploaded to Instagram, an online photo editing and sharing application.

“Up to that point, we had 700 photos on Instagram tagged with Warby Parker,” said Tim Riley, the company’s director of online experience. “Then the day of the photo walk, we had about 750 additional pictures tagged with our name. We also had 120 people in our offices and got to talk to all of them. It was a giant friendly hangout.”

As social media becomes an increasingly important part of retailers’ marketing and customer service efforts, it’s not just a matter of having the largest number of fans on Facebook or Twitter. Retailers also have to know how to engage users and how to turn those online conversations into positive offline interactions.

At a panel discussion on social media held this week as part of a conference organized by Wharton’s Baker Retailing Center, Riley and others from the industry discussed efforts to unlock the value in their online followings.

Read the full findings from KnowledgeToday

Gloria Allred Reveals Press List #pr #press

The hardest part of getting publicity for your product or service is who to contact.

Today, Gloria Allred inadvertently released her lengthy and comprehensive press list. Now your business can capitalize on her mistake by connecting with several journalists from the nations top news outlets.

Remember in your email to introduce yourself and keep your pitch short and sweet. Don’t forget to read my previous blog post: Determining The Best Online Press Release Distribution Site For Your Business to make your press releases social media friendly.

From: Gloria Allred
Date: Sun, Feb 26, 2012 at 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: Attorney Gloria Allred and Ginger White (who alleged that she had a thirteen year affair with Herman Cain) to attend Oscar Party together at Beverly Hills Hotel, February 26th, 2012
To: Gloria Allred

Cc: Daily Beast, 48 Hours – Gayan, ABC, ABC, ABC, ABC – Alison Ehrlich, ABC – DC, ABC – Mark Crudele Ch 7, ABC – Sarah Wallace, ABC 7, ABC 7 – Los Angeles, ABC 7 – Vania Stuelp, ABC News – Russell Goldman, Access Hollywod, Access Hollywood, Access Hollywood – NBC Uni – George Larrimore, AFP, AFP – Brigitte Dusseau, AFP International, Al Rantel Show – John Ingles, Aljazeera, AM New York, Anne Alderete, AOL – Christine Weicher, AP, AP, AP, AP, AP – Jonathan Resnick, AP – K Armstrong, AP – Linda Deutsch, AP – Rik Stevens, AP – Washington Bureau – Jill Gillum, AP-Anthony, Associated Press, Atlanta Journal Constitution – Jeremy Redmon, Atlantic Monthly, BBC, BBC – Regan Morris, Bill Beazley, Billy Bush, Bloomberg, Bloomberg News, Bloomberg News, Bloomberg SF, BNO News, Boston Herald, Bunte Magazine, Businessweek – Sheelah Kolhatkar, Buzz Media – Gillian Sheldon, Capitol Public Radio, CBC Toronto, CBS, CBS, CBS – Early Show, CBS – Early Show, CBS – Early Show, CBS -2, CBS Early Show, CBS KCAL Producer, CBS News, CBS News, CBS News – Chris Weicher, CBS2, CBS2 – Chicago – Kristin Hartman, Chris Yandek, Christopher Liss, Citynews, Clear Channel – Rebekah Baker, Clear Channel – Rogbin Bertolucci, CNBC Business, CNN, CNN, CNN – Ann O’Neil, CNN – Jessica Reinis, CNN – Karan Olson, CNN – Kevin Bohn, CNN – LA, CNN Radio – Jim Roope, “CNYCentral.com – Matt Mulcahy”, CTV – Canada, CTV – Canada, Daily Beast, Daily Breeze, Daily Express – London, Daily Journal, Daily Mirror – UK, Daily News, Daily News, Dateline – Falguni, David Schumacher, DC Examiner, Derek Boykoff, Dom Giordano Show, “Dr. Phil – Carla Pennington”, Harlan Boll, Steve Delsohn, Tony Coghlan, “Turner, Amy Doyle”, E Entertainment, E News – Ken Baker, E Producer – Steve Forrest, E TV – Jason Kennedy, EFE, Elie News, Ellen Ratner, Entertainment Weekly, EPA, ET – Entertainment Tonight, ET The Insider, EXTRA – Fernita, Extra Tv – Mario Lopez, “Filipski, Scott”, Foresight News – Ed Ware, Fortune Magazine, FOX – Emily Graham, Fox 11, FOX 5, Fox Business, FOX NEWS, Fox News, Fox News, Fox News, Fox News, Fox News – Atlanta – John Roberts, Fox News – Eric Spinato, Fox News – Greta Van Sustren, Fox News – Hollie McKay, FOX News – Kathleen Foster, Fox News – Michael Satsuda, Fox News – Thomas Fox, Fox News Miami, France NPR, Geraldo, Geraldo at Large, Geraldo Live Radio Show – Christina Timothy, Geraldo- Thomas Holmes, Getty Images, Getty Images, Getty Images, Getty Images – Sandy Ciric, Glamour Magazine, GMA, GMA, GMA – Sabina, GMA – Santina Leuci, GMTV, Greta, Greta Van Sustren, Guardian News – Ed Pilkington, Harvey Levin, HLN, HLN, Hollywood Reporter, In Touch, In Touch, In Touch Magazine – Jennifer Finn, In Touch Weekly – Gina Bacciocchi, Inside Edition, Inside Edition, Jack Noyes, James Desborough, John Pascarella – Maury, John Phillips, John Phillips – Jason Rose, John Phillips Show – Jared Hart, John Phillips Show – John Ingles, John Phillips Show – KABC 790 – Nathan Baker, Joy Behar, The Huffington Post – Women’s Page – Marlo Thomas, WFTV, Frank Morano, KABC, KABC, KABC – Leslie Miller, KABC – Radio, Karl Larsen, Katie Spencer, KCAL 9, KCBS, KCBS / KCAL, KCBS-KCAL, KFWB, KFWB 980, KNBC-Desk, KNX/KFWB, KOGO – San Diego, KPCC, KPCC, KRON, KSEE, KTLA – David Begnaud, KTLA – Denver, KTLA – Manny Medrano, KTLA 5, KTTV 11, LA Daily News, LA Daily News – Dana Bartholomew, LA Times, LA Times, LA Times, LA Times, LA Times – Andrew Blankstein, LA Times – James Oliphant, LA Times – Maura Dolan, LA Times – Sports, LA Times – Steve Lopez, LA Weekly, LA Weekly – S Wilson, LAist, Larry King, Laure Winer – NY Times, “Lissette Valdes-Valle (ElMundo)”, Live From Hollywood Radio Show – Candice Helen Hakimfar, LNS – Kris Knutsen, London Mail – Caroline Graham, Long Island Journal, Los Angeles Daily Journal – Brian Sumers, Los Angeles Magazine – Edward Leibowitz, Marc Victor, Mavrix Photo, Mavrix Photo, Mavrix Photo, Max Markson, Metro Network News Wire – Glenn Schuck, Metro Networks, Michael Levine, Molly Lopez, “Moody, Chris”, Morning Show – Victoria Richards, MSNBC, MSNBC – Booking, MSNBC – Gregg Cockrell, MSNBC – Jordan Chariton, Nancy Grace, National Enquirer, National Journal, National Journal – Noreen, National Post, NBC, NBC, NBC – Andrew Dallos, NBC – Carmen Conte-Widman, NBC – Cathernie Corrigan, NBC – Joanne Denyeau, NBC – Luz Villarreal, NBC – Marianne Haggerty, NBC – Ryan Ruggiero, NBC – Sindy Saito, NBC 4 – Kevin LaBeach, NBC Nightly News – Kelly O’Donnell, NBC UNIVERSAL, NBC Universal – Barbara Fant, NBC Universal – Mark Petrovich, New York Magazine, New York News, New York Post – Bruce Golding, New York Times – Dan Frosch, News Day, News Limited – Australia, News of the World, Nightline, Nine Network Australia – Henry Meller, Nine ZNetwork – 60 Minutes, NPR – Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR – Liz Halloran, NPR – Memmott, NPR – Tamara Keith, NPS – National Photo Group, NY Daily News, NY Daily News, NY Daily News – Michael O’Keeffe, NY Post, NY Post, NY Post, NY Post – Campanile, NY Times, NY Times – Ed Wyatt, NY Times – Joyce Wadler, NY Times – Michael Sher, OC Register, OK! Magazine, Oprah, Parade Magazine – Mary Margaret, Pasadena Star News, Pasadena Star News – Brian Charles, Patch – Gina Tenorio, People, People Magazine, Peter Lauria, Popeater- Bryan Alexander, Press Enterprise, Press Telegram, Jennifer Szalai – Elle, Melissa Weisberg, Radar Online, Radar Online – Jen Heger, RedThink Media, “Reinis@cnn.com”, Reuters, Reuters – Houston – Chris Baltimore, Reuters – Michelle Nichols, Reuters – Sam Mercovich, Reuters – Steve Holland, Riverside Press Enterprise, Robin Sax, Rumor Fix – Richard, “RumorFix.com – Jen Heger”, “RumoxFix.com – Chris Myers”, Ryan Seacrest Show REDACTED>, San Gabriel Valley News, San Jose Mercury News, San Jose Mercury News, Santa Monica Press, Sean Hannity – Lauren Fritts, SF Chronicle, SF Chronicle, SF Daily Journal, She Knows – Whitney English, Sipa – French Press, Splash News, Splash News – Ian Burchell, Sports Net Central – Julie Donaldson, Star Magazine, Syracuse Post-Standard – John O’Brien, Talk Radio News, Talking Points – Evan McMorris, Talking Points – Jillian, Telegraph UK, Telegraph UK – Jon Swaine, Telemundo – Eduardo Suarez, The Daily – Matt Nestel, The Daily Orange at Syracuse Univ – Marwa Eltagouri, The Hill – Justin Sink, The Hollywood Reporter, The New Yorker – Ariel Levy, The Sun, The Sun, The Sydney Morning Herald – Paul McGeough, The Times – UK – Alex Frean, The Wrap, Thomson Retuers, Thomson Reuters, Thomson Reuters, Thomson Reuters, Thomson-Reuters, TMZ – Christie Bear, Today Show, TURNER, Turner, Turner – Adam Reiss, Turner – Allison Blakely, Turner – Bob Ruff, Turner – Chris Kokenes, Turner – Devon Sayers, Turner – Emily Barsh, TV Asahi America, TV Guide, UK Sunday Times, US Magazine – Melanie Bromley, Us Weekly – Senta Scarborough, USA Today, USA Today – Ann Oldenburg, USA Today – Jackie Kucinich, USC – Annenburg Television News, Vanity Fair, Wall Street Journal, Wall Street Journal – Alisha Mundy, “Walsh, Andrew”, Washington Post, Washington Post, WCBS, WeHo News, WGN Chicago – Christina, Will Lee – Hollywood Life, Wins Mail, WSJ, WSJ, X17, X17 Agency

Erika Kirsten Beck is the owner and president of Ryder Media Consultants (RMC) which designs, develops and implements custom public relations and social media business strategies and campaigns that create awareness for an organization’s products or services. She specializes in social media strategy development.

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